Weekly Media Roundup

Administrator August 9, 2013 2
Weekly Media Roundup
  • Awesomness

 


WEEK ENDING AUG. 9, 2013


HCCS to vote to authorize pre-admission for all 6-9th graders in servicing district

August 9, 2013

Houston Community College System announced late today that its Board of Trustees will vote during its next meeting to authorize the conditional pre-admission of all 6th through 9th grade students in the HCC servicing area. “Houston Community College remains committed to ensuring that every student who is willing to work for a college education is able to do so — no matter their individual circumstance. I believe that when students know from an early age that they have somewhere welcoming to go to continue their education beyond high school level, they will work harder to make sure they get there. We hope that the community will come out to show its support for this historic event,” said Trustee Carroll G. Robinson.

The meeting will be on Thursday, August 15 at 4 p.m. at 3100 Main Street on the 2nd floor and is open to the public.

WEEK ENDING JULY 19, 2013

From the Texas Tribune

Texas A&M President Loftin stepping down


By Reeve Hamilton

Texas Tribune    July 13, 2013

Texas A&M University President R. Bowen Loftin will step down from his position in January, he notified university leaders on Friday.

Loftin has officially been president since February of 2010, though he had been serving in an interim capacity since June 2009.

Click here to read more.

From the San Antonio Express-News

 

45 Texas professors sign letter in support of lower student loan interest rates

By Hannah Jeffrey : Monday, July 15, 2013

More than 1,000 educators representing 568 institutions of higher education across the country have signed a petition to support Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s student loan bill, effectively joining forces in the fight to lower interest rates on federal subsidized loans.

Texas contributed 45 signatures to the petition, representing 24 of the Lone Star State’s colleges and universities, including Texas A&M and University of Texas at Austin.

Click here to read more.

From the San Antonio Express-News

New savings plan could help student debt

By Jennifer R. Lloyd : July 18, 2013
Creating automatic child saving accounts at birth could propel students toward college and offer a solution to the country’s financial aid woes, a new report released this week shows.

William Elliott, a University of Kansas associate professor and editor of the report, said the savings accounts would be similar to existing 529 college savings plans for public and private college costs.

However, they’d add features to engage youths in early saving for college, which may help the nation’s economy by producing graduates with better financial futures.

Click here to read more.

From the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal Online

 

For Texas veterans, a fight for college credit

Posted: July 18, 2013

Texas Army veteran Ryan Rafols worked as a missile defense engineer during his time in the U.S. Army, operating military defense systems, calculating targets and maintaining computer systems.

But when Rafols came back to Texas and applied to the engineering school at the University of Texas at Austin earlier this year, he was told none of his experience would count toward his degree. That made no sense to him.

Click here to read more.

From the Dallas Morning News

 

Supreme Court ruling puts new focus on whether Texas’ ‘Top 10 Percent’ admissions rule is working

By JEFFREY WEISS

The Dallas Morning NewsStaff Writer

29 June 2013 11:27 PM

 

Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court kicked the University of Texas affirmative action admission plan back to lower courts for “strict scrutiny.” The “Top 10 Percent” rule will likely get a closer look.

The rule, created by the state Legislature in 1997, guarantees admission to state colleges for students with the best grades in any Texas high school. It was created after courts killed the state’s prior affirmative action plan.

The rule’s designers wanted to open the door to more blacks and Hispanics, bring in more rural applicants and blunt the effect of the SAT and ACT tests.

How well did it work? The University of Texas at Austin’s answer to the Supreme Court is: Not well enough; other measures are needed to ensure sufficient diversity.

 

Click here to read more.

From the North Texas E-News

Grayson College helps create statewide college marketing group

 

By Grayson College

Jul 19, 2013

Grayson College has taken a leadership role in forming a new statewide college marketing organization and has helped plan the group’s inaugural conference held last month in Austin.

Shelle Cassell, Grayson College director of Marketing and Public Information, joined several other marketing directors in Austin last November to discuss the need for a statewide consortium of community college marketing professionals. With the support of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the group formed the Texas Association of Community College Marketers (TACCM) in February

Click here to read more.

From the TAMUTimes

Texas A&M Ranked Among Nation’s Top 10 Colleges For Degree Value

Lane Stephenson

News & Information Services                July 16, 2013

Texas A&M University is among the nation’s top 10 institutions judged by College Databaseto have alumni with the largest 30-year earnings difference from non-degree holders. Texas A&M placed eighth nationally on the new return-on-investment (ROI) calculation and is the only school in Texas or the Southeastern Conference (SEC) to rank among the top 10 on the online organization’s basis for determining degree value.

Click here to read more.

From the San Antonio Express-News (Commentary)

 

Texas needs higher ed infrastructure to thrive

Cyndi Taylor Krier and Joe Krier, For the Express-News : June 28, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry has dedicated himself to making Texas the best place in the country to start, expand or move a business, and through his leadership, we’ve seen our economy emerge as a national model for job creation and economic growth.

Investing in higher education is a crucial part of the Texas model, and that’s why tuition revenue bonds (TRBs) — the funding mechanism for campus construction projects — should be considered during a second special session. Student enrollment is growing, campus infrastructure is aging, and interest rates are low. Now is the time to invest in the infrastructure that will ensure our universities can educate the Texans who will power our state’s economy for decades to come.

Click here to read more.

From the BioNews Texas

 

UT Dallas In Vanguard Of Texas Universities’ Friendly Competition For “Tier One” Status

Posted Thursday, July 18, 2013

A report in the current edition of UT Dallas Magazine notes that concepts outlined in a paper drafted by UT Dallas President David E. Daniel several years ago helped inspire Texas Legislature House Bill 51, known as the Tier One bill, authored by State Rep. Dan Branch and signed by Governor Rick Perry in 2009. The bill released hundreds of millions of dollars for higher education and raised the profile of an elite group of what the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has referred to as “emerging research universities.”

Click here to read more.

From the Sun Sentinel

 

Report: Ricky Williams to coach RBs at small college in Texas

July 18, 2013|From the Web

CBSsports.com is reporting that mercurial former Miami Dolphins All-Pro running back Ricky Williams has been hired to coach running backs for University of the Incarnate Word.

As a Dolphin, Williams had the franchise’s greatest season by a running back, rushing for 1,853 yards in 2002.

However, NFL sanctions for drug use resulted in an abbreviated and interrupted stint in Miami.

The school is located in San Antonio and has fewer than 10,000 undergraduates.

WEEK ENDING JANUARY 25, 2013

From the Austin American-Statesman

 

2 lawmakers predict changes in higher education funding

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz

American-Statesman Staff

Friday, Jan. 25, 2013

Two key state lawmakers said Thursday that they expect the Legislature to approve a plan to hinge 10 percent of base funding for public universities and community colleges on graduation rates, the number of degrees awarded and other so-called student outcomes.

Sen. Kel Seliger and Rep. Dan Branch also agreed that the Legislature should pay for a major round of construction and renovation projects on campuses, although they differed on how the work should be funded.

Click here to read more.

 

From the Austin American-Statesman

Higher education leaders face uphill budget battle

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz

American-Statesman Staff

Higher education leaders in Texas were hoping to recover considerable ground in the legislative session that began last week following cuts two years ago of nearly $1 billion in state funding.

They’re still expressing optimism, but they could face an uphill battle based on the 2014-15 budgets proposed in the state House and Senate. Under those bills, spending would decline again, albeit by much less.

Click here to read more.

From the Longview News-Journal

King: Perry takes on higher education

One of the high profile, high stakes battles being waged in the Texas capital is over what higher education in Texas will look like in the future. Gov. Rick Perry declared the war by concluding the state’s major universities, and the University of Texas and Texas A&M in particular, were in need of serious reform.

The intellectual fuel for Perry’s ideas of reform come from the Texas Public Policy Foundation, a conservative Austin think tank that devotes a substantial portion of its efforts proposing solutions to what it believes are inefficiencies and waste in state government.

The foundation and its allies have been advocating a menu of changes to the way higher education is managed. It argues those changes would bring down the costs for students and, nearer to its heart, taxpayers. The foundation’s proposals attempt to create some accountability for higher education’s productivity.

Click here to read more.

 

From the Corpus Christi Caller Times

Texas community colleges face shortfall

Budget draft is $400M less than asked

Matthew Waller

January 24, 2013

AUSTIN — Despite record enrollment numbers, community colleges in Texas are facing a drop in state funding this year, which could force them to raise tuition and local taxes.

Community colleges hold more than half the students enrolled in public higher education, and 70 percent of freshmen in public higher education, Texas Association of Community Colleges spokesman Steve Johnson said.

Click here to read more.

 

From the Odessa News

Nursing program approved by higher ed board

First of two necessary hurdles cleared for UTPB’s new Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree

 BY LINDSAY WEAVER lweaver@oaoa.com

Plans for the new nursing program at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin received a shot in arm Thursday as the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approved the four-year Bachelor of Science in Nursing program.

UTPB President David Watts said he’s hoping students can begin taking classes this fall.

The request by UTPB was approved with no discussion, according to Martha Delgado, who works in external relations for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in Austin.

Click here to read more.

 

From Inside Higher Ed

 

College Chiefs Contemplate Completion

January 24, 2013
By Libby A. Nelson
College leaders should embrace the goal of getting college degrees into the hands of more Americans, which may require changes in campus culture and more aggressive steps to improve graduation rates, a group of college presidents from across all sectors wrote in an open letter to their peers released Wednesday night.
Click here to read more.

 

 

WEEK ENDING JANUARY 4, 2013

From the Huffington Post online

Rick Perry Versus the School Children of Texas

By James Moore
January 6, 2013

The conservatives of the Texas legislature are about to try again to fool the state’s taxpayers into funding private schools with a voucher program. The Republican argument, which falls apart under scrutiny, has been that no child should be condemned to attend a failing public school. No conservative wants to talk about why the public school system might be troubled, however, nor do they contemplate the even greater long-term damages to be wrought by school choice.

Click here to read more.

From the San Antonio Express-News

Legislators lay out higher education plans

 

Lawmakers could alter method to fund universities.

By Jennifer R. Lloyd, January 7, 2013

College students won’t be the only ones trudging back this month from a long break.

State legislators will hit the Capitol’s hallways Tuesday to begin promoting a host of bills that could reshape aspects of the state’s higher-education system, from basing a portion of universities’ state funding on outcomes such as graduation rates to whether students can carry concealed weapons on campus.
Click here to read more.

From the Houston Chronicle (Reprint)

Texas ranking in national list of graduation rates is highly dubious

Federal statistics run counter to other measures of performance

January 4, 2013
Texas state officials have recently touted new high school graduation rates released by the U.S. Department of Education. For the first time, every state in the nation is required to use the same calculation to gauge the number of dropouts. With all states measured uniformly, the Department of Education’s report hoped to facilitate comparison among states and their respective education policies.

Texas ranks highly – tied for fourth-best in the nation – according to these figures, reporting 86 percent of students as graduating. As our state is apt to do, Texans have greeted these results with self-congratulation, crediting among other factors statewide testing with staving dropouts.

Click here to read more.

 From the Texas Tribune

UNT Regents Fire Health Science Center President

by Reeve Hamilton  December 22, 2012
The regents of the University of North Texas System fired Dr. Scott Ransom, the president of the University of North Texas Health Science Center, at a Friday meeting called expressly for that purpose.

According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Ransom left the meeting without talking to reporters following the regents’ unanimous vote.
Click here to read more.

From the Abilene Reporter News

Legislature to talk tuition, graduation rates

By Jim Vertuno Associated Press

December 28, 2012

AUSTIN — The tug-of-war between Gov. Rick Perry and state universities is still going strong heading into the 2013 legislative session with new skirmishes over money looming.

After lawmakers cut nearly $1 billion in higher education spending from institutions and financial aid for students, schools want that money back.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

College Addresses Growing Need for Mental Health Services

by Reeve Hamilton  December 18, 2012

Little makes Dr. Norma Ngo, the director of Counseling and Psychological Services at the University of Houston, sadder than hearing a student say, ‘‘I never even knew you guys existed.”

“Even if I get that senior in their last semester,” she said, “I’m thrilled because at least they got some counseling before they left.”

Click here to read more.

WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 21, 2012

From the Texas Higher Education Journal

Highlights from the 1st annual African American Males in College Achievement & Success Symposium

By De J. Lozada
Publisher/Editor-In-Chief

On December 3-5, 2012, more than 150 higher education stakeholders from around Texas and the U.S. convened in Austin, Texas, for the first annual Texas African American Males in College Achievement & Success Symposium.

The event was held at the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center located at 1165 Angelina Street in historic downtown East Austin and was sponsored by the Texas Higher Education Journal with partnering support from the Texas National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) — Education Division, Educate Texas and the Texas Association of Black Personnel in Higher Education (TABPHE). According to organizers, the symposium marked the first time for a statewide convening wholly dedicated to discussing issues directly impacting black male students seeking a post secondary certificate or degree.

Click here to read more.

From theeagle.com

 

>Dewhurst talks higher education for 2013 session

From the Associated Press

Texas Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst said Thursday that the state needs to produce more job-ready graduates and qualified workers, something that could require more investment in higher education.

Dewhurst, in an appearance at Texas Christian University, stressed that he wasn’t making any specific proposals on higher education in advance of the legislative session that starts in January. But Dewhurst, who presides over the Texas Senate, said he would be working with senators to study education funding, pushing more students into technology-related majors and others in high demand, and giving parents more options when their students’ schools are lagging.

“Businesses … are complaining to me almost daily about the lack of a trained workforce here in Texas,” Dewhurst said.

Click here to read more.

From the Community Impact Newspaper Online

State to decide on proposed tuition freeze, $10,000 degree challenge

by John Rigg

December 19, 2012

With the Texas Legislature beginning its session next month, several organizations and state officials are submitting bills for discussion. One topic backed by Gov. Rick Perry is a proposition to lock in tuition charges for incoming college freshman to counter a year-after-year increase seen throughout the last decade.

According to a study by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, about 78 percent of college undergraduates from four-year universities in Texas were previously enrolled at a two-year institution such as Lone Star College.

“To a certain degree, we do believe that rising tuition at four-year universities plays a role in increasing enrollment at two-year colleges,” said Jed Young, LSCS executive director of communications. “More students see the value of attending a college close to home and then transferring.”

Click here to read more.

From The Brownsville Herald

Hidalgo County endorses university merger

By Jared Janes The Monitor

December 18, 2012

Hidalgo County commissioners endorsed a plan to merge South Texas’ two universities by saying it would make the new institution a “top tier place for higher education in the Valley.”

Commissioners adopted a resolution Tuesday in support of the proposed merger between the University of Texas-Pan American and the University of Texas at Brownsville, creating a new, unnamed university that will be a home to a South Texas medical school. Although UT System regents approved the merger of their two southernmost institutions in early December, the plan requires the support of two-thirds of the state Legislature.

Click here to read more.

 From the Austin-American Statesman

Chancellors urge lawmakers to increase higher education funding

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz

American-Statesman Staff

Five chancellors of university systems in Texas urged state lawmakers on Monday to increase funding for higher education, including student financial aid and campus construction projects.

“The one part of the budget that makes money for the state of Texas is higher education,” said Kent Hance, chancellor of the Texas Tech University System, noting that college graduates earn more than people with only a high school education, which translates into more spending, more tax revenue and other economic benefits.

Hance made the comment during a meeting with American-Statesman editors and reporters that also included the chancellors of the Texas A&M;, Texas State, University of North Texas and University of Houston systems.

Click here to read more.

From the Dallas Business Journal

Performance-based funding tops higher-ed legislative agenda

by Bill Hethcock, Staff Writer

December 18, 2012

Performance-based funding will be the higher education highlight of the upcoming Texas Legislature, says state Rep. Diane Patrick, R-Arlington.

I spoke with Patrick for our legislative preview report, which will run in the Dec. 21-28 print edition of the DBJ.

The goal, she said, will be to change the higher education funding formula to give institutions financial incentives to boost graduation rates rather than funding universities based largely on enrollment of students.

Click here to read more.

From the National Center for Science Education

“Intelligent design” legislation in Texas again

December 14, 2012

House Bill 285, prefiled in the Texas House of Representatives on December 14, 2012, would, if enacted, add a provision to the state’s education code providing, “An institution of higher education may not discriminate against or penalize in any manner, especially with regard to employment or academic support, a faculty member or student based on the faculty member’s or student’s conduct of research relating to the theory of intelligent design or other alternate theories of the origination and development of organisms.”

Filed by Bill Zedler (R-District 96), the bill will not be considered until the legislature convenes, on January 8, 2013, at the earliest.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING NOVEMBER 2, 2012

From the Dallas Morning News

Texas study: Community college transfers slower to earn 4-year degrees

By CLAIRE CARDONA

Austin Bureau
ccardona@dallasnews.com
Published: 28 October 2012 11:18 PM

AUSTIN — Policymakers hope that community colleges can be a cost-effective and efficient pathway for more students to earn a four-year university degree, but the numbers suggest otherwise.

A new report by the state Higher Education Coordinating Board shows that students who transfer after taking 60 hours take an average of two years longer to graduate than those who began at the university.

A spokesman said that the lag may be attributable to a higher prevalence of work and family concerns among community college students.

Click here to read more.

From the New York Times (Texas Tribune)

Amid Slowing College Enrollment, Fears of Missing Goals

By REEVE HAMILTON

Representative Dan Branch, Republican of Dallas, does not want to hear about the state’s education goals not being met.

“It makes me very sad and frustrated,” Mr. Branch said at a recent hearing of the House Higher Education Committee, which he heads. “I get heartburn, and I tend to get cranky.”

At that hearing, Raymund A. Paredes, the state’s higher education commissioner, outlined Texas’ latest enrollment numbers. According to preliminary data gathered by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, the total number of students attending college this fall increased by just 12,000, to about 1.563 million, over the previous year, a significant slowing in the state’s progress toward its objectives.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Board Proposes Major Overhaul of TEXAS Grants Program

by Reeve Hamilton

October 25, 2012

TEXAS Grants, the state’s primary need-based financial aid program for college students, could get a major retooling next session if lawmakers follow new recommendations by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

In 2011, the Legislature cut funding for TEXAS Grants for the first time in its history and established a model for distributing the awards that favored high-performing students.

According to the coordinating board, with current levels of funding and award amounts, only about 18 percent of eligible students would be able to receive TEXAS Grants. But with some changes they think they could reach more students, a move they hope would encourage more to attend college.

Click here to read more.

From the Daily Texan

UT System’s debt accounts for over half of Texas’ total public university debt

November 1, 2012  BY ALEXA URA

The UT System’s $7.3 billion worth of outstanding debt accounts for 58 percent of the state’s total public university debt, according to a report released by Susan Combs, Texas comptroller of public accounts, last week.

As of August 2011, the total outstanding debt of public four-year higher education institutions totaled $12.5 billion, making up 43 percent of the state’s total debt. The UT System is the largest public university system in the state, and its outstanding debt includes money owed by nine academic institutions, six health institutions, the Permanent University Fund and System Offices debt.

Click here to read more.

From the UT System News

Doctoral Program in Statistics to Advance Research in Health Care and Technology

Nov. 1, 2012

AUSTIN, Texas — The University of Texas at Austin’s newest Ph.D. program in statistics was unanimously approved recently by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

The program, managed by the College of Natural Sciences’ Division of Statistics + Scientific Computation, will provide doctoral students with rigorous training in advanced statistical methods and first-hand experience applying and developing such methods to analyze complex data in diverse fields.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Texas A&M System Launches EmpowerU Website

by Reeve Hamilton

October 29, 2012

Texas A&M University System officials will unveil EmpowerU, their new public accountability website on Monday morning, at a news conference in the Capitol.

The initiative, to gather comprehensive data on all system institutions and package it in a user-friendly manner online, has been in the works for more than a year. After all that time and effort, A&M System Chancellor John Sharp is expecting the site to inspire a significant reaction in Texas and beyond.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas WatchDog.org


Texas state payroll shrinks, though not in higher ed or at the DMV

By Mark Lisheron November 1, 2012

Social services, criminal justice and education were largely responsible for reducing the state payroll by ½ a percent in the past fiscal quarter in Texas.

The reduction of 1,620 full-time positions, bringing the total down from 297,502.9 positions, was nearly offset by the addition of 1,587.6 positions in the state’s institutions of higher education, according to a new report by the state Auditor comparing employment in the previous quarter to the same period in 2011. (See a chart tracking the change here.)

While total higher education staffing increased by 1.1 percent to 148,557.9 full-time equivalencies, the number of administrators jumped by 2.4 percent over the same period a year ago to 3,023.6 positions.

Click here to read more.

From the Alpine Avalanche

Higher education – a great investment for Texas

By Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison

 

A thriving economy depends on a vibrant business culture, and Texas is arguably the best state to do business in the nation. Our low taxes and reasonable approach to regulation, coupled with our abundant natural resources, have made us a prime destination for industries from energy to technology.

But there is one other crucial factor to success: higher education.

Click here to read more.

From the Daily Texan

Texas Exes scholarship named for Senator Judith Zaffirini

October 31, 2012  BY ALEXA URA

The Texas Exes announced a new scholarship named for Sen. Judith Zaffirini, a long-time champion of affordable higher education.

The Senator Judith Zaffirini Scholarship was announced Tuesday morning during a ceremony hosted by the Texas Exes, the independent UT alumni organization. The scholarship will first be awarded to one student in fall 2013 and will be awarded to multiple students per year in the future.

Click here to read more.

From the UT System

New Black Studies Doctoral Program a First for Texas, Region

Oct. 30, 2012

AUSTIN, Texas — The Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board approved a new doctoral program in Black Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, marking a first for the university, the state of Texas, and the American South and Southwest.

The Department of African and African Diaspora Studies (AADS) in the College of Liberal Arts will administer the new degree program, which was approved by the board at their regular meeting Oct. 25.

“This is a historic moment for The University of Texas at Austin and for the state of Texas,” said department Chair Edmund T. Gordon.

Click here to read more.

From the Corpus Christi Caller.com


Texas Education Agency commissioner: There could be more flexibility with state accountability system

By Elaine Marsilio  Posted October 26, 2012

CORPUS CHRISTI — Newly appointed Texas Education Agency Commissioner Michael Williams said he has ideas for making the school accountability system more flexible for school districts.

As the state enters a second year of testing under the new State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, Williams said he has heard concerns from about 90 superintendents regarding the complexity of the existing accountability system.

Click here to read more.

WEEK ENDING OCTOBER 19, 2012

From the Texas Higher Education Journal

Texas Higher Ed Journal sponsors statewide Black Male Success Symposium

The Texas Higher Education Journal presents the 1st Annual  Texas  African American Males in College Achievement & Success Symposium scheduled for December 3-5, 2012 in Austin, Texas.

This first-of-its-kind event will give education practitioners the opportunity to join distinguished national and state educators, legislators, business and civic leaders to collaborate and discuss best and promising practices for African American male college student achievement.

Themed “Establishing a Framework for Success:  Effective Modeling of National Best Practices in African American Male College Achievement,” the TAAMASS  will feature Texas native Dr. Fred Bonner, Samuel DeWitt Proctor Chair in Education for Rutgers University Graduate School of Education, in New Jersey, and Dr. Karl Reid, Senior Vice President for Academic Programs and Strategic Initiatives for the United Negro College Fund in Washington, D.C., as keynote speakers.

Click here to read more.

From the Brownsville Herald

Official paints bleak picture of education

Posted: Thursday, October 18, 2012 10:33 pm | Updated: 10:31 pm, Thu Oct 18, 2012.

BY STEVE CLARK THE BROWNSVILLE HERALD

Texas and the United States are doing a lousy job educating their young people and it’s going to cost us dearly in terms of economic competitiveness if we don’t do something quick.

Nowhere are the challenges greater, meanwhile, than in the Rio Grande Valley and other border regions.

Click here to read more.

From the Reuters.com

Getting the most out of an online education

By Kathleen Kingsbury

Fri Oct 19, 2012 3:29pm EDT

(Reuters) – Online learning just got a lot bigger: Last week the University of Texas announced plans to bring its nine universities and six health institutions to the Internet.

Courses from the state higher education system will soon be offered via edX, the $60 million initiative launched last spring by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to provide free, Web-based classes. The University of California at Berkeley joined forces with edX in July, and now Texas will invest $5 million.

Click here to read more.

From the Politics365.com

Racism and the University of Texas

By George E. Curry

The affirmative action program at the University of Texas now under review by the United States Supreme Court should not be looked at in isolation. As Justice Sandra Day O’Connor wrote in Grutter V. Bollinger, an affirmative action case involving the University of Michigan, “context matters when reviewing race-based governmental action under the Equal Protection Clause.”

An amici curiae (friend-of-the-court) brief filed by the Advancement Project, an equal opportunity advocacy group, provides excellent context of how the issue of race has played out in Texas and the University of Texas for decades.

Click here to read more.

From The Alcalde

New Senate Higher Ed Chair Not Sold on Top 10 Percent Law

BY ANDREW ROUSH IN PROMOTE & PROTECT ON OCTOBER 17, 2012 AT 6:48 PM

Texas politics website Quorum Report published a quote from newly appointed Texas Senate higher education chair Kel Seliger (R-Amarillo) on Tuesday that throws the future of the state’s Top 10 Percent law into doubt. While Seliger supports the general concept of increasing diversity at Texas universities, he’s not sure the Top 10 Percent Law is the best way to do it.

The 1997 law guarantees admission to Texas public universities for all high school students who graduate in the top 10 percent of their class, as determined by grade point average. The rule proved so popular that the Legislature was forced to cap automatic admissions to UT-Austin at 75 percent of the freshman class.

Click here to read more.

From the PolitiFact Texas

Rick Perry says less than 30 percent of Texas college students graduate in four years, only 58 percent in six years

Written by: W. Gardner Selby
Rick Perry, who has said he wants the 2013 Legislature to impose a four-year tuition freeze for incoming freshmen, said at a Dallas press conference that such a move would give students an economic incentive to graduate on time.

“Less than 30 percent of our students graduate in four years; only 58 percent of our students have their degrees in six years,” Perry said, according to an Oct. 2, 2012, Dallas Morning Newsnews story. “That is a system that can and must be improved.”

Click here to read more.

From the Austin American-Statesman

Posted: 10:53 a.m. Friday, Oct. 19, 2012

Schwertner: A&M invests wisely in education and Texas

By Jim Schwertner

In a tight economy, investing more is not always the answer. Investing more wisely is. That makes all the difference at the Texas A&M University System.

We are making higher education more affordable, offering undergraduate degree programs beginning at $9,800. These include a bachelor of science in business administration from Tarleton State University, a bachelor of applied sciences in organizational leadership offered through Texas A&M University-Commerce and South Texas College, and a bachelor of applied arts and sciences in information technology offered through Texas A&M University-San Antonio and Alamo Colleges. These degree plans offer the academic preparation and career and technology training that employers demand and students need.

Click here to read more.

From Education Week

Community Colleges Rethink Placement Tests

By Caralee J. Adams

College-placement tests can make or break a student’s career. Yet few students prepare for them, and there’s little evidence to suggest the tests even do what they’re designed to do.

Now, some community colleges are looking for alternatives. Some are switching to high school grades or revamping assessments, while others are working with high schools to figure out students’ college readiness early so they have time to catch up if necessary.

Click here to read more.


From the Huffington Post Education

College Courses In High School Yield Students More LIkely To Attend, Graduate From College: Study

Posted: 10/17/2012 1:41 pm Updated: 10/17/2012 1:41 pm

A report by Boston-based education nonprofit Jobs for the Future urges policymakers to expand dual enrollment after determining that high school students who take college courses are more likely to attend and graduate from college than those who do not.

Results showed that high school students who completed a college course before graduation were nearly 50 percent more likely to earn a college degree from a Texas two- or four-year college within six years than students who had not participated in dual enrollment.

Click here to read more.

WEEK ENDING AUGUST 17, 2012

From Inside Higher Education

Texas Gets an Incomplete

By Paul Fain August 14, 2012 The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has terminated a high-profile college completion grant in Texas, a decision one community college leader in the state called abrupt and surprising. Dubbed Completion by Design, the $35-million grant encourages groups of two-year colleges in four states to work together to keep more low-income and young students from slipping through the cracks and to better help guide them on a pathway to graduation. Teams of colleges in Florida, North Carolina, Ohio and Texas beat out 27 teams in nine states to participate in the five-year project, which began in 2010.

Click here to read more.

From the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

UNT to consider combining main campus, health science center into one institution

BY DIANE SMITH Aug. 10, 2012 dianesmith@star-telegram.com

DENTON — University of North Texas regents will decide next week whether to begin a study to determine whether the university’s Fort Worth health science center should be combined with the main campus in Denton into one academic institution, a model described as more beneficial for research. On Thursday, the UNT board of regents will consider studying whether to put both schools under one umbrella. The UNT Health Science Center would remain in Fort Worth, officials said. Click here to read more.

From the TimesRecordNews

Is higher education failing Texas?

Expert points out problems to MSU regents

By Ann Work August 11, 2012

If Texas doesn’t do a better job of educating its youth for the jobs that exist, its workforce will look more like Mexico than America, said Raymund Paredes, commissioner of Higher Education for the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. The obstacles are serious, pervasive and rooted at all levels of education, he said Friday.

Click here to read more.

From the El Paso Times

Lowered rating unlikely to hurt college chances of EPISD students

Admissions officials rank students’ record

By Hayley Kappes / El Paso Times 08/16/2012

College admissions officials across the state said placing the El Paso Independent School District on probation should not jeopardize current students’ higher education goals. The Texas Education Agency on Monday handed down several sanctions to the district, which included lowering its accreditation to probationary and assigning a monitor after it became embroiled in a widespread cheating scandal.

Click here to read more.

From the Examiner.com

Texas Education “Expert” Barton’s Book Recalled

BY: CHARLES MCALPIN AUGUST 13, 2012

The most recent book by David Barton, a leading history consultant for the controversial Texas State Board of Education, was recalled by its publisher for Friday due to matters of fact which were not supported at all. Barton’s book The Jefferson Lies: Exposing the Myths You’ve Always Believed About Thomas Jefferson, was itself found to be guilty of “factual errors” and “historical misinterpretations”by publisher Thomas Nelson.

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From the Austin American-Statesman

Obama administration defends UT’s use of race in admissions

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration Monday threw its support behind the University of Texas’ use of race as a standard in its admissions policies, asking the U.S. Supreme Court not to interfere with the consideration of racial preferences in college admissions. The Justice Department, in a court brief co-signed by several other government agencies, told the high court that a diverse college population was in the university’s — and the government’s — best interests.

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From IVN.com

New Report Encourages Students To Consider Debt When Choosing a Major

 

ByShawn M. Griffiths on 08/15/2012 Students in the Liberal Arts are all too familiar with the parental lecture that they should consider a degree that has more serious applications in the real world. Parents tend to look further into the long term and worry about the student loan debt their children will take on after they graduate. TG, a public, non-profit corporation, released a report for the Texas Legislature that emphasizes the need for students to also consider the full weight of the debt burden when choosing a major. Click here to read more.

From Forbes.com

Can We Prevent An Education Bubble?

By Timothy Smith, Contributor
Many media have finally recognized the education bubble and the potential that it may hurt our economy more than the housing bubble. However, two experts in the field of education know this and are trying to change the way we see education – Dr. Raymund Paredes and Salman Khan. Dr. Raymund Paredes is the Texas Commissioner of Higher Education (you can read his full bio here) and we spoke briefly about the challenges and opportunities with the educational system.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING AUGUST 10, 2012

From the San Antonio Express-News

Closing Gaps stats showing improvement

Express-News Editorial Board
Tuesday, August 7, 2012

Texas colleges and universities continue to make progress toward meeting the goals laid out in the state’s higher education plan adopted in 2000 despite continuous roadblocks cast in their path by state lawmakers.

More than half a million more students are enrolled in Texas colleges and universities today than there were 12 years ago. While much room remains for improvement on completion rates, students are graduating in larger numbers. Some 186,961 certificates, bachelor’s and associate degrees were awarded in 2011, an increase of more than 60 percent since 2000.

Click here to read more.

From the Lindale News & Times

Perryman Report: Look into future shows good times for Texas

By Dr. M. Ray Perryman Tuesday, August 7, 2012

We recently completed our annual long-term forecasting effort. (If you’re a regular reader of this column, you have recently seen highlights of our projections.)

After sorting through massive amounts of information, my conclusion is that Texas stands to outperform most parts of the United States over an extended time horizon. Even so, the state faces unique challenges in addition to those facing the nation (such as the ongoing difficulties in Europe and the potential “fiscal cliff” at the end of the year).

One major challenge facing the Lone Star State is educational attainment. The percentages of Texans with associate or higher degrees is lower than that of the United States as a whole, and a number of competing states rank much higher than Texas. In addition, there are disturbing patterns such as a drop in the percent of young adults with associate degrees or higher in Texas, while the proportion in the United States is rising (and both are far below other nations such as Korea)

 Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune


Fewer Than Half of Texas Schools Meet Federal Requirements

by Hollie O’Connor

August 8, 2012

The Texas Education Agency announced on Wednesday that fewer than half of Texas schools met yearly requirements set by the federal government under the No Child Left Behind Act.

In a press release, the agency said heightened federal standards this year are the reason that only 44 percent of Texas campuses achieved the goal of an 87 percent passing rate for reading and an 83 percent passing rate for math on state standardized tests. Sixty-six percent of Texas schools met the federal requirements last year, when the passing rate goals were 80 percent for reading and 75 percent for math.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

In Preparing Texas Students for College, a Struggle

by Morgan Smith

August 5, 2012

The short answer to whether most Texas students leave public schools prepared for college? No.

Less than one in two students met the state’s “college readiness” standards in math and verbal skills on ACT, SAT and TAKS scores in 2010. Though average SAT scores in both verbal and math dropped between 2007 and 2010 — a trend that state education officials have attributed to an increase in students taking the test — more students in the same period of time have met the state’s standards for college ready graduates, largely because of improvements on their state standardized tests and the ACT.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Meningitis Vaccine Mandate Could Get Tweaked in 2013

by Reeve Hamilton

August 10, 2012

Mike Dreith, the former president of Western Texas College in Snyder, remembers early 2012 as a period of sleepless nights. A new state law had just taken effect, requiring virtually every college student to be vaccinated against bacterial meningitis before stepping on campus.

With students from 35 states and 17 countries descending on the rural college for the spring semester in January — many of them unaware of the requirement for a vaccine that was in scarce supply locally — achieving full compliance in time would have been impossible, Dreith said recently. Rather than preventing unvaccinated students from enrolling, he let them attend classes as they awaited inoculation.

Click here to read more.

From the Corpus Christi Caller-Times Editorial Board


A Texas higher education funding proposal with merit

Shane Fitzgerald is Caller-Times’ Vice President and Editor.

Posted August 5, 2012

CORPUS CHRISTI — A few years ago — before I had kids in college (I have two in there now) — I would have thought outcome- or merit-based higher education funding was crazy. It would be an impediment to young men and women finding themselves in the university environment and figuring out what they wanted to be when they grew up. For some, that might have taken three changes in major and six years to complete. And that was understandable to me. And it still is, on some level.

You know what, though? We can’t afford that now.

Our editorial board on Wednesday met with the state’s commissioner of higher education, Raymund A. Paredes, before he spoke at a local luncheon. His conversation with us and his lunchtime talk prompted a good debate among board members. I’ll tell you now, we don’t all agree.

Click here to read more.

From the Ventura County Star

Crisp: Education, profit motive don’t mix

John M. Crisp teaches in the English Department at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. Email him at jcrisp@delmar.edu.

August 6, 2012
The U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions issued a report last week with a revealing title: “For-Profit Higher Education: The Failure to Safeguard the Federal Investment and Ensure Student Success.”

I doubt if many people will read the entire 1,100-page document, but the 14-page executive summary will tell you just about all you need to know: Every year, hundreds of thousands of students emerge from the for-profit sector of higher education with, as the summary puts it, “debt but no degree.”
Click here to read more.

From the BizJournals.com

WGU Texas Celebrates First Anniversary with Enrollment Over 3,000

PR Newswire

Aug. 3, 2012

AUSTIN, Texas, Aug. 3, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Just one year after the state establishedWGU Texas through a partnership with Western Governors University, the nonprofit,  online universityhas grown to enrollment of more than 3,000 students, a 60 percent increase since its launch. WGU Texas was established on August 3, 2011, by Executive Order from Governor Rick Perry with bipartisan support of the Joint Legislative Committee on Oversight of Higher Education Chairs, Senator Judith Zaffirini and Representative Dan Branch.

Click here to read more.

From the San Antonio Business Journal

San Antonio Business Journal by W. Scott Bailey, Reporter/Project Coordinator

Friday, August 3, 2012

No San Antonio university cracked the top 100 on Forbes’ list of America’s 650 Top Colleges.

Trinity University came close at No. 101.

The university rankings are compiled for Forbes by the Washington, D.C.-based Center for College Affordability and Productivity.

Schools are ranked based on a number of factors, including the quality of professors and high graduation rates.

Click here to read more.

From the Huffington Post

The Best Colleges To Work For: Chronicle of Higher Education 2012 List

The Huffington Post  |  By Alyssa Creamer  08/08/2012

In the Chronicle of Higher Education‘sfifth annual survey of faculty and staff, 103 colleges were recognized as “Great Colleges To Work For” based on several categories measuring the schools as a workplace environment.

Endicott College, which made theChronicle’s Honor Roll list, received praise from its employees for its administration’s policy of talking through contractual agreements in informal, as well as formal, settings. The employees attributed this policy as one of the factors that altered a once tense and distrustful relationship between employers and employees at the school.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING AUGUST 3, 2012

From the Corpus Christi Caller-Times

State’s higher education agency once again proposes controversial merit-based funding for colleges

By Rhiannon Meyers

Posted August 1, 2012

CORPUS CHRISTI — Too few Texas college students graduate on time and not enough major in high-demand careers, prompting the state’s higher education agency to once again propose a controversial merit-based funding system.

The proposal calls for the state to link 10 percent of undergraduate funding to specific outcomes rather than fund institutions solely on enrollment.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Design Flaw Suspected In Texas Standardized Tests

 

by Morgan Smith  July 30, 2012

In 2006, a math pilot program for middle school students in a Dallas-area district returned surprising results.

The students’ improved grasp of mathematical concepts stunned Walter Stroup, the University of Texas at Austin professor behind the program at Richardson Independent School District. But at the end of the year, students’ scores had increased only marginally on state standardized TAKS tests, unlike what Stroup had seen in the classroom.

A similar dynamic showed up in a comparison of the students’ scores on midyear benchmark tests and what they received on their end-of-year exams. Standardized test scores the previous year were better predictors of their scores the next year than the benchmark test they had taken a few months earlier.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

A&M System Chancellor to Announce New Research Fund

by Reeve Hamilton

August 1, 2012

Texas A&M University System ChancellorJohn Sharp on Thursday will lay out a plan before the system’s board of regents that will shuffle the distribution of money for Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University, earmarking millions of dollars to grow research at those universities.

Click here to read more.

From The Paper Magazine.com

Texas Completes announces strategies for student success

 

Submitted by The Editor on Thu, 08/02/2012

HOUSTON, TX (Aug. 1, 2012) – Lone Star College System and its Texas community college partners are moving from planning into implementation with their statewide student success and credential completion effort called “Texas Completes.”

The group is announcing its initial action plan and strategy for transforming the Texas community college completion rate with the findings of its first year of collaboration. These bold, innovative initiatives are being implemented by the five Texas Completes partners as a first step in the effort to create a unified student pathway to success and include:

 Click here to read more.

From the Wilson County News.com

Commentary: The Economist: a major challenge

Dr. M. Ray Perryman
August 2, 2012

We recently completed our annual long-term forecasting effort. (If you’re a regular reader of this column, you have recently seen highlights of our projections.) After sorting through massive amounts of information, my conclusion is that Texas stands to outperform most parts of the United States over an extended time horizon. Even so, the state faces unique challenges in addition to those facing the nation (such as the ongoing difficulties in Europe and the potential “fiscal cliff” at the end of the year).

One major challenge facing the Lone Star State is educational attainment. The percentages of Texans with associate or higher degrees is lower than that of the United States as a whole, and a number of competing states rank much higher than Texas. In addition, there are disturbing patterns such as a drop in the percent of young adults with associate degrees or higher in Texas, while the proportion in the United States is rising (and both are far below other nations such as Korea).

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING JULY 27, 2012

From the Austin American-Statesman

State’s financial aid program to fall well short of need

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz Thursday, July 26, 2012

The state’s higher education agency approved a legislative appropriations request Thursday that falls far short of meeting the financial aid need in Texas, where more and more college-age students come from low-income families.

Members of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, meeting in Austin, voted 9-0 to ask lawmakers to allocate $580.8 million for Texas Grants, the state’s main aid program.

Click here to read more.

From the Austin American-Statesman

ACC spending $2 million at new Round Rock campus to repair damage from shifting soil

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz Thursday, July 26, 2012

Less than two years after Austin Community College opened its Round Rock campus, officials have budgeted $2 million to repair problems caused by shifting soil, including sidewalks that heaved up enough to keep some doors to buildings from opening properly.

Officials blame last year’s severe drought and this year’s heavy rains, but they are nonetheless reviewing work done by firms that provided engineering and architectural services to check whether reasonable precautions were taken.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune


TACC Recommendations Target Next Legislative Session

by Shefali Luthra July 26, 2012

Priorities that the Texas Association of Community Colleges is outlining for the next legislative session will mark the “the most comprehensive” set of goals the association has ever articulated, a TACC spokesman said.

TACC’s goals address issues like transfer policies between community colleges and state institutions, how much funding community colleges receive and ensuring that community colleges are properly training students to enter the Texas workforce.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Texas High School Graduation Rates Improve, but Why?

by Morgan Smith July 22, 2012

When it comes to the number of students who graduate from its public high schools, Texas is not accustomed to being called a success.

The last time the Texas Supreme Court ruled on the state’s school finance system, in 2005, it warned of a “severe dropout problem,” calling the lagging graduation rates of blacks and Hispanics in the state “especially troublesome.”

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

A&M’s Outsourcing Plans Have Workers Concerned

by Reeve Hamilton and Matthew Watkins, The Bryan-College Station Eagle

July 27, 2012

When the Texas A&M University System announced that its flagship would gain $260 million in new revenue and savings in the next 10 years by outsourcing its building maintenance, landscaping and dining services, Chancellor John Sharp said the plan was an unprecedented way to raise money in financially struggling higher education.

“Today’s announcement means more money will be available to recruit, pay and retain faculty and researchers,” he said at a news conference on June 21.

Click here to read more.

From the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Texas A&M dedicates biodefense center

Monday, Jul. 23, 2012
BY MICHAEL GRACZYK

Associated Press

COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Texas A&M University on Monday dedicated the first element of its new national biodefense center where researchers are to work on strategies to respond to bioterrorism and swiftly develop vaccines for a pandemic or some chemical, biological or nuclear threat.

The A&M Center for Innovation in Advanced Development and Manufacturing is the first of five facilities being developed by the school’s partnership with the federal government, other academic institutions and private firms. It is one of three such national centers. Others are in Maryland and North Carolina.
Click here to read more.

 

From the Hays Free Press

Helping Latino students stay in college at Texas State University

Posted byKim Hilsenbeckon Jul 18th, 2012
Transitioning from high school to college can be tough for Latino students, according to recent research by Excelencia in Education, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that advocates for higher education success for Latinos.

The report shows that about 17 percent of Latino adults in Texas have an associate degree or higher, compared to 34 percent of all adult Texans.
Click here to read more.
From the Washington Post

Texas GOP rejects ‘critical thinking’ skills. Really.

By Valerie Strauss

In the you-can’t-make-up-this-stuff department, here’s what the Republican Party of Texas wrote into its 2012 platform as part of the section on education:

Knowledge-Based Education – We oppose the teaching of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) (values clarification), critical thinking skills and similar programs that are simply a relabeling of Outcome-Based Education (OBE) (mastery learning) which focus on behavior modification and have the purpose of challenging the student’s fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority.

Click here to read more.

 

 

WEEK ENDING JULY 12, 2O12

From the Daily Toreador

Tech begins its search for interim, new president

Katelin Kelly, Staff WriterDaily Toreador – Dept. of Student Media, Texas Tech University

On Wednesday, Texas Tech president Guy Bailey officially was hired as the new president for his alma mater, the University of Alabama.

After serving as president for Tech since 2008, Bailey will return to his home state in the fall to begin his second university presidency position.

Click here to read more.

From the Washington Post

Texas GOP rejects ‘critical thinking’ skills. Really

 By Valerie Strauss

In the you-can’t-make-up-this-stuff department, here’s what the Republican Party of Texas wrote into its 2012 platform as part of the section on education:

Knowledge-Based Education – We oppose the teaching of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) (values clarification), critical thinking skills and similar programs that are simply a relabeling of Outcome-Based Education (OBE) (mastery learning) which focus on behavior modification and have the purpose of challenging the student’s fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Texas Won’t Adopt Common Science Standards Soon

by Morgan Smith July 9, 2012

New nationally developed common science standards may be on the horizon, but it is not likely that they will make their way into Texas classrooms soon.

Make that a “zero percent chance,” said Barbara Cargill, the Republican chairwoman of the State Board of Education.

Click here to read more.

From the Huff Post Education

The Texas Model of Higher Education Reform

Posted: 07/03/2012

The past few weeks have been eventful for higher education in Texas, and their results may well ripple across the country. The great dilemma faced by both Texas and every other state in the union is how simultaneously to rescue public higher education’s business model and increase student learning. Texas has long been known for thinking big. Its approach to higher education reform is no exception. It has begun a two-track reform effort that consists not only of expanding its signature, $10,000-degree programs but also, and more importantly, of introducing measures to increase the transparency with which public colleges and universities operate.

Click here to read more.

From the Killeen Daily Herald

Texas A&M-Central Texas fills graduate studies post

By Chris McGuinness
Killeen Daily Herald

Texas A&M University-Central Texas bolstered its graduate degree programs by hiring a new associate vice president of graduate studies and research.

The university announced Monday that it selected Russell Porter, a researcher, author and a former captain in the United States Air Force, for the position.

Click here to read more.

From the San Antonio Express-News

Schools need adequate funding to reach higher academic standards

Brian Gottardy and Gary Patterson and Brian Woods, Express-News
July 11, 2012
The Legislature has failed to provide a rational, adequate and equalized funding system that allows all Texas students to meet our new, higher education standards.

That is why the Fort Bend ISD group, which is comprised of 82 school districts that collectively educate more than 1.8 million students, is suing the state to protect our students and to enforce the clear requirements of the state Constitution.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Texas State University System Has $10,000 Degree Plan

by Reeve Hamilton July 12, 2012

The Texas State University System is the state’s third major university system to announce the development of a bachelor’s degree that only costs $10,000 — a response to Gov. Rick Perry‘s 2011 call for more affordable higher education offerings.

Sul Ross State University Rio Grande College, an upper-division college in the Texas State University System, has partnered with Southwest Texas Junior College to create a new “10K Scholars Program.” Its degree model, which will become available in fall 2013, appears to be something of a hybrid of the previous two models introduced in the state.

Click here to read more.

From The Daily Texan

New university ranking places UT at 30th in the world

Published 10 Jul 2012  By Max Bridges

The University of Texas ranked 30th in a list of the top 100 universities in the world released July 1 by The Center for World University Rankings.

Click here to read more.

From the Orlando Sentinel

Number of Floridians ages 25-34 with college degree fell in 2010

By Mark K. Matthews, Washington Bureau
July 12, 2012

The number of young Floridians with a college degree fell in 2010 to about 817,000 — a decrease of about 19,000 from 2009, according to new estimates.

The Florida drop runs counter to a national uptick in college-educated Americans that the Obama administration plans to tout when the nation’s governors gather in Virginia later this week. In 2010, 15.9 million Americans between the ages of 25 and 34 had a college degree, a bump of about 100,000 from the year before.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Why STEM Matters: Educators and Experts Sound Off

by Reeve Hamilton July 5, 2012

“STEM,” an acronym for “Science, Technology, Engineering and Math” is a term that is becoming increasingly common across education circles. It is often followed by the word “crisis.”

Click here to read more.

From the Huffington Post


The Texas Model of Higher Education Reform

By Dr. Thomas K. Lindsay 07/03/2012

The past few weeks have been eventful for higher education in Texas, and their results may well ripple across the country. The great dilemma faced by both Texas and every other state in the union is how simultaneously to rescue public higher education’s business model and increase student learning. Texas has long been known for thinking big. Its approach to higher education reform is no exception. It has begun a two-track reform effort that consists not only of expanding its signature, $10,000-degree programs but also, and more importantly, of introducing measures to increase the transparency with which public colleges and universities operate.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING JULY 7, 2012

From the Texas Tribune

Why STEM Matters: Educators and Experts Sound Off

by Reeve Hamilton July 5, 2012

“STEM,” an acronym for “Science, Technology, Engineering and Math” is a term that is becoming increasingly common across education circles. It is often followed by the word “crisis.”

Click here to read more.

From the Huffington Post


The Texas Model of Higher Education Reform

By Dr. Thomas K. Lindsay 07/03/2012

The past few weeks have been eventful for higher education in Texas, and their results may well ripple across the country. The great dilemma faced by both Texas and every other state in the union is how simultaneously to rescue public higher education’s business model and increase student learning. Texas has long been known for thinking big. Its approach to higher education reform is no exception. It has begun a two-track reform effort that consists not only of expanding its signature, $10,000-degree programs but also, and more importantly, of introducing measures to increase the transparency with which public colleges and universities operate.

Click here to read more.

From Education Week

ACT to Roll Out Career and College Readiness Tests for 3rd-10th Grades

By Caralee Adams on July 2, 2012

 ACT Inc. announced today that it is developing a new series of assessments for every grade level, from 3rd through 10th, to measure skills needed in college and careers.

The tests, which would be administered digitally and provide instant feedback to teachers, will be piloted in states this fall and scheduled to be launched in 2014, says Jon Erickson, the president of education for ACT, the Iowa City, Iowa-based nonprofit testing company.

Click here to read more.

From Inside Higher Ed


For-Profit Grads’ Wage Disadvantage

By Scott Jaschik July 3, 2012

In analyzing the salary gains associated with various kinds of academic programs, advocates of for-profit higher education have noted that the sector’s students tend to be less prepared for postsecondary work than are students in other sectors. A study released Monday by the National Bureau of Economic Research agrees with that generalization. But it finds that, even when controlling for such factors, there is an advantage for the nonprofit sectors in boosting salaries, over the for-profit sector.

Click here to read more.

From the Associated Press

Big rewards, less job security for college leaders

 

By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER

Helicopter parents, impatient trustees, overworked professors, entitled athletics boosters and deeply partisan lawmakers with little cash to spare. It’s enough to make people wonder why anyone would want the job of college president.

Click here to read more.

From Inside Higher Ed


Private Sector, Public Money

By Paul Fain June 29, 2012

For-profit colleges took a hit this week in California, another sign that policy battles over the commercial higher ed sector may be shifting to the states.

Gov. Jerry Brown on Wednesday signed the state’s budget, which he said reflects “tough choices” to close a $16 billion shortfall. Among the budget cuts was a $134 million reduction in spending on the generous Cal Grant financial aid program, a cut that will mostly affect students at for-profit colleges.

Click here to read more.

From Education Week

Draft of Common Science Standards Draws Friendly Fire

By Erik Robelen on June 28, 2012

The first public draft of common science standards is encountering some criticism from a prominent teachers’ organization and a Washington-based think tank, with the former complaining of a “lack of clarity and coherence” in the performance expectations, and the latter saying the draft serves up an overdose on scientific “practices” while omitting some key content knowledge that it argues needs to be explicitly included.

Click here to read more.

From the MSNBC.com Blog


Thousands of veterans failing in latest battlefield: college

By Bill Briggs

During a pair of six-month stints in and around Fallujah, Iraq –- then a fiercely volatile city –- Navy corpsman Lucas Velasquez came to know about life.

And death.

From late 2005 through early 2007, not long after nearly 100 U.S. troops and more than 1,350 insurgents were killed in Fallujah during Operation Phantom Fury, Velasquez routinely rendered emergency aid to wounded Marines while ducking bullets, rocket-propelled grenades and IED blasts. In uniform, Velasquez was smart and quick, adept at practicing field medicine literally while under the gun.

In 2007, after retiring from the Navy, Velasquez, then 23, enrolled at Columbus State University in western Georgia. He promptly failed four of his first six classes.

Click here to read more.

From the Huffington Post


North Carolina Online Charter School Can’t Open Without State Approval, Judge Rules

By Wade Rawlins

RALEIGH, N.C., June 29 (Reuters) – A judge said on Friday that a private company cannot open the first online charter school in North Carolina this fall unless it has the approval of a state agency.

Click here to read more.

From the Associated Press


Hawaii law establishes early learning program

A new law requires Hawaii students be at least 5 years old on July 31 to enter kindergarten the same year.

Hawaii is phasing out junior kindergarten to make way for implementation of an early learning program. Legislation that Gov. Neil Abercrombie signed into law Thursday establishes an early learning office that he says will help develop a plan for the program.

Click here to read more.

From Education Week

Report: Make Improving Teacher Working Conditions a Priority

By Liana Heitin on June 28, 2012

To boost teacher retention and student achievement at high-poverty schools, states and districts must first look to improve working conditions for teachers, concludes a new report by The Education Trust, a Washington-based nonprofit group. The report profiles five school districts that have focused efforts on bettering teacher support and development—specifically by strengthening leadership and encouraging professional collaboration—and have shown promising or positive gains as a result.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING JUNE 29, 2012

From the Austin American-Statesman

Charter advocates sue over funding, cap on schools

By Kate Alexander

June 26, 2012

Texas charter school advocates on Tuesday opened up a new front in the school finance battle with a lawsuit claiming that disparities in funding and a cap on new schools violate the state constitution.

The lawsuit, which was filed in Travis County, is separate from the mammoth public school finance litigation brought by hundreds of traditional school districts as well as some charter school supporters.

Click here to read more.

From the Austin American-Statesman


Another postscript on Muny, proposed medical school

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz | June 29, 2012

Here’s another postscript regarding the ongoing discussion concerning a proposed medical school at the University of Texas:

Paul Saldaña, president of Austin-based Brisa Communications LLC, wrote to Travis County commissioners this week regarding efforts by defenders of a West Austin golf course to link its preservation to support for a medical school. He said the medical school and other proposed health care initiatives would be especially helpful to Hispanics, many of whom lack health insurance.

As for efforts by Save Muny to condition support for a medical school on preservation of the Lions Municipal Golf Course, Saldaña wrote: “Such myopic stances go far beyond petty politics — they undermine the actual health of this community and the progress we badly need to make.”

From the Texas Tribune

Questions in Higher Ed Coordinating Board’s Future

by Reeve Hamilton

June 29, 2012

In reviewing the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and considering its future, the Sunset Advisory Commission concluded that it should continue to exist for at least another 12 years. That’s the good news.

Then there’s everything else. Even if the odds of its continued existence are high, the ground is being laid for a very serious conversation about the coordinating board’s structure and operations when lawmakers convene next session.

Click here to read more.

From the Austin American-Statesman


College Board developing new test for incoming students in Texas

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz

June 26, 2012

The College Board is developing a test for determining the academic readiness of incoming college students in Texas under a contract with the state’s higher education agency.

The new test, expected to be in place by the summer of 2013 for the 2013-14 academic year, would replace a handful of tests currently used by public colleges and universities. However, students who took the SAT or ACT and achieved a college-ready score would not have to take the new test.

Click here to read more.

From the San Antonio Express-News

Texas State scores grant to help Hispanic students

Jennifer R. Lloy, San Antonio Express-News
By Jennifer R. Lloyd

June 27, 2012

The U.S. Department of Education has announced $12.2 million in grants to 19 higher education institutions — including Texas State University-San Marcos — to boost educational opportunities for Hispanics, according to a news release.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

When UT Appeared to Be in UVA’s Shoes, Many Spoke Out

by Reeve Hamilton

June 27, 2012

On Tuesday, the University of Virginia reinstated President Teresa Sullivan after her forced resignation this month sparked a dramatic outcry. Throughout the ordeal, observers have drawn parallels to Sullivan’s former stomping grounds: the University of Texas at Austin, where she worked for nearly three decades.

For the last year and a half, speculation has swirled about the intentions of some University of Texas System regents. Many feared that those regents — appointed by Gov. Rick Perry — were put in place to implement a controversial set of dramatic policy changes the governor had promoted that some criticized for being anti-academic and overly business-minded. So when Sullivan was abruptly terminated at UVA, apparently over her opposition to her board’s eagerness to push rapid top-down changes, UT observers’ antennas perked up.

Click here to read more.

From the Bryan/College Station TheEagle.com


Texas A&M may face obstacles in law school purchase

By Matthew Watkins

June 28, 2012

John Sharp learned that Texas A&M wanted a law school around 1972, when he was 22 years old.

One of his first bosses, Bryan state Sen. William T. Moore, had been working toward the goal, but complained of interference from people like Frank Erwin, the politically connected chairman of the University of Texas System Board of Regents. The effort went nowhere.

 

Forty years later, Sharp is chancellor of his alma mater’s university system and spearheaded the effort for A&M to buy the Texas Wesleyan School of Law. A&M announced the purchase Tuesday, pending state approval. Now, Sharp hopes the state’s political landscape has shifted enough for him to achieve his old boss’s agenda.

Some signs point to Austin now being a friendlier place for that goal. There is an Aggie governor, Rick Perry, who has expressed public support for the idea. And the chairman of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Fred Heldenfels, is an Aggie donor.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

Business Leaders Draw a Line on Education Funding

by Morgan Smith and Zoë Gioja

June 27, 2012

Leaders in the business community said Wednesday that they would not stand for increased funding for education if it came with any rollback of accountability standards in Texas public schools.

“If we are going to remain competitive in the world’s market, we are going to have to have an educated workforce. We do not have one today,” said Bill Hammond, the president of the Texas Association of Business. “We will vigorously oppose additional money for the public school system unless and until we are certain that the current accountability system is going to be maintained.”

Click here to read more.

From Inside Higher Ed

Senate Reaches Deal on Loans

By Libby A. Nelson

June 27, 2012

With less than a week remaining until the interest rate on federally subsidized student loans is set to double, Senate leaders said Tuesday afternoon that they had agreed on a compromise to keep the rate at 3.4 percent for another year.

Click here to read more.

From The Chronicle of Higher Education


A Conversation With Bill Gates About the Future of Higher Education

By Jeffrey R. Young

June 25, 2012

Bill Gates never finished college, but he is one of the single most powerful figures shaping higher education today. That influence comes through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, perhaps the world’s richest philanthropy, which he co-chairs and which has made education one of its key missions.

Click here to read more.

From The Chronicle of Higher Education


For-Profit-College Marketer Settles Allegations of Preying on Veterans

By Michael Stratford

An online marketing company that recruits veterans and other students on behalf of mostly for-profit colleges has agreed to pay $2.5-million and shut down one of its sites to resolve allegations of predatory practices.

Click here to read more.

From Inside Higher Ed


150 Years of College Access

By Elise Young
June 27, 2012

Public colleges must increase access by keeping costs of attendance down and harnessing technology to engage and educate students, a parade of big-name speakers said Tuesday at a conference celebrating the sesquicentennial of the national legislation that established public universities.

Click here to read more.

From the Hechinger Report


New online tests hold promise, perils

By Sarah Garland

On a recent afternoon at Townsend Elementary School here, a little boy squinted at a computer screen and gripped his mouse. He was stuck. Half of the screen contained an article about rainforests. The other half was filled with questions, some multiple-choice, some not.

One question asked the boy to pick two animals that belonged in the rainforest from a list of pictures and written descriptions. Then he was supposed to drag the animals across the screen onto the rainforest background. Next, he had to move two correct descriptions of rainforest characteristics into boxes. He raised his hand.

“I don’t understand,” he whispered to his fourth-grade teacher.

“Read the directions again,” she whispered back.

Click here to read more.

From the Hechinger Report

College enrollment shows signs of slowing

By Jon Marcus

Harvard, Yale and a few other selective universities may be announcing record numbers of applications for the semester beginning in the fall, but higher-education officials are fretting about ominous signs that overall college enrollment is starting to drop.

Click here to read more.

From EdWeek


Testing Group Wrestles With ‘College Readiness’ Meaning

By Catherine Gewertz

The unprecedented work to design assessment systems for the common standards is bringing together K-12 and higher education in new ways. But it is also forcing new and sometimes uncomfortable discussions about the heart and soul of the enterprise: the meaning of college readiness.

Click here to read more.

 From the Hechinger Report

Q&A with Dan Chambliss: A successful college education can come down to a single conversation

By Nick Pandolfo

How does someone succeed in college? It’s the $64,000 question—or, these days, more like the $150,000 question—whose answer has been sought by countless policymakers, researchers and universities over the years.

In a new attempt to provide insight into the discussion, sociologists Dan Chambliss of Hamilton College and Christopher Takacs of the University of Chicago took the long road to an answer. In 2001, they started conducting what would turn into a 10-year study of Hamilton College students in an attempt to learn what had the greatest effects on their college experiences. What were the turning points? What mattered most? What didn’t?

Click here to read more.

From EdWeek

Tackling Teacher Turnover at Charter Schools

By Sean Cavanagh on June 25, 2012

There’s some research that shows charter schools suffer from higher teacher turnover than traditional public schools do. One recent estimate put turnover in charters at 25 percent per year, compared with just 14 percent in traditional public schools. Several explanations have been offered for this attrition. Charter school teachers, for instance, tend to be relatively young, and more susceptible to making quick exits from the profession, some studies suggest. Dissatisfaction with working conditions, and lack of administrative support have also been cited as reasons why charter teachers tend to head for the door.

Click here to read more.

From the New Jersey.com

Sweeping N.J. teacher’s tenure bill passes Legislature, heads to Gov. Christie’s desk

June 25, 2012
By Salvador Rizzo/Statehouse BureauThe Star-Ledger

New Jersey’s public-school teachers and principals would have to ace their own yearly test if they want to attain job security under a bill that won final passage in the Legislature today.

The Assembly unanimously approved legislation sponsored by state Sen. Teresa Ruiz, capping more than a year of debate on how best to reshape the first tenure law in the United States.

Click here to read more.

From The Chronicle of Higher Education

June 26, 2012


193 Vocational Programs Fail ‘Gainful Employment’ Test

By Michael Stratford

About 5 percent of vocational programs that are subject to the Education Department’s controversial gainful-employment rule failed to meet the regulation’s three key benchmarks that will eventually be required for them to receive federal student aid, data released by the department today show.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING JUNE 22, 2012

From the Houston Business Journal

Texas’ higher education system earns mixed grades

by Olivia Pulsinelli, Web producer

Date: Wednesday, June 20, 2012, 11:16am CDT

By Olivia Pulsinelli
Web producer- Houston Business Journal

Texas’ higher education system earned some mediocre grades on a recent report card.

The Institute for a Competitive Workforce, an affiliate of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce    , graded each state and its four-year and two-year institutions on a number of factors in its recent “Leaders & Laggards: A State-by-State Report Card on Public Postsecondary Education” report.

Click here to read more.

From the El Paso Times

UTEP has US’ 12th lowest net student costs

By Hayley Kappes \ El Paso Timeselpasotimes.com

Posted: 06/18/2012

The University of Texas at El Paso has the 12th lowest net student costs among four-year public universities in the country, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

The net price to attend UTEP is $2,066 per academic year, which is the average cost paid by full-time, first-time students after grants and scholarships are factored. Nationally, the average annual net price to attend a four-year university is $10,471.

Click here to read more.

 

From the Houstonian Online


Former SGA President appointed to Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board

SHSU student looks to improve higher education as newest member to THECB

By McKinzie Brocail
Senior Reporter
Updated:  June 19, 2012

A regular course load for a student at Sam Houston State University includes 15 class hours and searching for a part-time job. For one student, the work includes representing more than 1 million college students.

Ryan Bridges was appointed Student Representative of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) in Austin by Gov. Rick Perry.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

UT-Arlington President Spaniolo Announces Retirement

by Reeve Hamilton

June 18, 2012

No outside pressure, internal unhappiness or specific event led University of Texas at Arlington President James Spaniolo to his decision to announce his retirement, he told the Tribune on Monday.

“There’s no sense of dissatisfaction or ambition or anything like that that prompted me to make this decision,” he said. “I’m not being recruited. I’m not anticipating any specific opportunity. I’m not looking to be a university president someplace else.”

Click here to read more.

From PRNewswire


Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine announce fellowship in child abuse pediatrics

HOUSTON, June 20, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ – Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine’s (BCM) Department of Pediatrics announced the availability of a three-year American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited fellowship program in child abuse pediatrics. The fellowship is designed to extensively train pediatricians to become academic leaders in all areas of child abuse and neglect including physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect and medical child abuse.

Click here to read more.

From KTRE ABC Online

Oldest 2-year college in TX struggles to keep doors open

Updated: Jun 20, 2012

By Jena Johnson

JACKSONVILLE, TX (KLTV) – An East Texas college campus needs help keeping their doors open. Lon Morris College in Jacksonville announced Wednesday afternoon they are looking for an educational institution to partner with.

The administration says over the past years, they’ve experience negative cash flow, and now this is their last hope.

Click here to read more.

From the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

A&M College Station campus privatizes dining, cleaning services

Posted Thursday, Jun. 21, 2012

BY JIM VERTUNO
The Associated Press

AUSTIN — Texas A&M University has hired a private company to run its campus dining, landscaping and building maintenance and cleaning services in a deal officials said was worth about $260 million in cash and savings for the school over the next decade.
Click here to read more.

 

From the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Title IX turns 40

Posted Thursday, Jun. 21, 2012

Title IX is about to hit middle age.

What has she got to show for her 40 years?

In anticipation of Saturday’s anniversary, let’s inquire.

Why do many people think that Title IX just makes men’s and women’s sports fight over limited funds?
Click here to read more.

From the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

B-On-Time could be better managed

Posted Thursday, Jun. 07, 2012

If a major state agency isn’t getting $32 million where it needs to go, that’s a pretty good sign that something’s not working properly.

Turns out that the deficiencies identified in the B-On-Time student loan program are only one indicator of problems within the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

A sunset review of the higher ed agency didn’t reveal misdeeds, just plenty of things that must be changed to properly oversee 38 public universities, 50 community college districts, nine health science centers, three state colleges and four state technical colleges. The board also collects data from 44 private schools.
Click here to read more.

Read a response from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board here.

 

WEEK ENDING JUNE 15, 2012

From the Austin American-Statesman

Average price of 4-year university up 15 percent

By Christine Armario

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Published: Tuesday, June 12, 2012

The average tuition at a four-year public university climbed 15 percent between 2008 and 2010, fueled by state budget cuts for higher education and increases of 40 percent and more at universities in a few states.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

New Report Puts Higher Ed Coordinating Board On Defense

by Reeve Hamilton June 12, 2012

During the 2011 session, Texas legislators quietly added a rider to the state budget allocating up to $350,000 to hire a national consultant to develop a blueprint for a statewide administrative system for Texas community colleges.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune

UT’s Community College Program Faces Transition

by Reeve Hamilton June 13, 2012

 Since its inception in 1944, the University of Texas at Austin’s Community College Leadership Program has established a reputation as one of the country’s top talent generators for community college administrators. Its graduates include Texas standouts like Austin Community CollegePresident Richard Rhodes and Western Governors University Texas Chancellor Mark Milliron.

But with the departure of its longtime leader and restructuring involving the program, some fear that the university’s commitment to community college issues may be on shaky ground.

Click here to read more.

From Marketwatch


UTEP Ranks High Nationally for Affordability

PRESS RELEASE June 14, 2012

EL PASO, Texas, June 14, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — At a time when people are focused on the cost and value of a college education and degree, data released June 12 by the U.S. Department of Education shows The University of Texas at El Paso as the best value and most affordable emerging research institution of higher education in the country.

Click here to read more.

From HeraldNet.com

Require colleges to provide clearer financial figures

By Michelle Singletary

Washington Post

Some things just can’t be left up to voluntary compliance.

In yet another effort to get colleges and universities to be level about the costs of higher education, the Obama administration has persuaded 10 schools to provide important financial information to incoming freshmen starting with the 2013-14 school year.

Click here to read more.

From EdWeek

Dept. of Education Updates College-Cost List

By Caralee Adams on June 12, 2012 5:32 PM

Students looking closely at the cost of college will find updated information today on schools with the lowest and highest tuition—and where is it going up fastest—at the U.S. Department of Education’s College Affordability and Transparency Center.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING JUNE 8, 2012

 

From the El Paso Inc.

William Serrata: EPCC’s new president

By David Crowder El Paso Inc. staff writer

William Serrata, who will take over as the new president of El Paso Community College on Aug. 1, is by all accounts a rare find.

He comes to El Paso from South Texas College in McAllen, which was established by the Texas Legislature in 1993 to serve the Lower Rio Grande Valley.

Click here to read more.

From the Austin American-Statesman

Caribbean medical school’s proposal stirs controversy in Texas

By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz

June 10, 2012

A proposal by a medical school on the Caribbean island of St. Maarten to send some of its students to Texas for clinical training has divided the governing board of the state’s higher education agency, led to a review by the attorney general and prompted key lawmakers to weigh in.

Click here to read more.

From the Houston Chronicle

Colleges step up efforts to stop student debt

By Monica Rhor
June 10, 2012
Mercadi Crawford, the first in her family to graduate from high school and the first to go to college, admits she knew little about the intricacies of financial aid when she enrolled at Texas Southern University.

But Crawford, who was raised in a single-parent household, knew that getting to graduation day would require loans.

She could have been on the road to emerging from school saddled with debt. Instead, Crawford got some lessons in financial literacy from TSU’s financial aid department and kept her student loans down to a little more than $10,000.

Click here to read more.

From MarketWatch.com

First Marblehead Announces Launch of Texas Extra Credit Education Loan Program

June 6, 2012

BOSTON, MA, Jun 06, 2012 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) — The First Marblehead Corporation today announced that it has entered into a loan program agreement for the Texas Extra Credit Education Loan Program with Higher Education Servicing Corporation (“HESC”), a Texas-based non-profit organization. The loan program was launched on June 1, 2012, in time for the upcoming academic year.

Click here to read more.

From Inside Higher Ed


Texas Shake-Up

May 30, 2012  By Paul Fain

AUSTIN – John E. Roueche, the founder of the most established graduate program for aspiring community college leaders, located here at the University of Texas at Austin, is moving in July to National American University, a for-profit institution, where he will attempt to create a similar operation.

“We’ll be working with them to design and build a doctoral program,” said Roueche, who has led UT’s Community College Leadership Program for 41 years.

Click here to read more.

From the Texas Tribune


Texas Gets Creative With Recycling Water

by Kate Galbraith June 11, 2012

On the outskirts of the Permian Basin town of Big Spring, workers have spent the last few weeks putting a roof on a facility that will, when it begins operating this year, become perhaps the first plant in the nation to process wastewater to put into a drinking water system.

Click here to read more.

From Inside Higher Ed


Early Exit at U. of Virginia

June 11, 2012 By Scott Jaschik

Early Sunday morning, the University of Virginia sent out a notice announcing that the Executive Committee of the Board of Visitors would have an “emergency closed meeting” at 2 p.m. “to consider amending the contract of a university employee.” A little later, the university announced that Teresa A. Sullivan would be leaving the presidency on August 15, after only two years in office, by mutual agreement with the board.

Click here to read more.

From KWTX.com


Texas College Student’s Body Recovered From Colorado River

June 10, 2012

Searchers have recovered the body of Waley Liang, 21, who fell into the Colorado River several days ago during a trip with University of Texas at El Paso geology students, to Utah, authorities said.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING JUNE 1, 2012

From the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Revolution under way in higher education

BY MITCHELL SCHNURMAN May. 30, 2012

mschnurman@star-telegram.com

Last year, when Gov. Rick Perry challenged educators to develop a $10,000 college degree, it sounded like a gimmick. Then Texas A&M-San Antonio unveiled such a plan, built largely around dual-credit classes at a local community college.

But why stop at 10 grand? And why limit a low-priced education to lesser-known schools?

Click here to read more.

From the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Trowbridge: Texas legislators neglect low-income and minority students

Posted Monday, May. 28, 2012
BY RONALD L. TROWBRIDGE
Special to the Star-Telegram

It may seem exaggerated to accuse the Texas Legislature of neglecting low-income and minority students, but facts show otherwise. The recent decision by regents at the University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M University at College Station to freeze tuition reveals that tuition is just too high. A study released in April by the University of Pennsylvania’s Institute for Research on Higher Education reveals that multi-thousands of low-income and minority students cannot even begin to dream about college.

Click here to read more.

 From the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal Online

Higher education, Lubbock leaders discuss progress

Enrollment

By BRITTANY HOOVER May 31, 2012
AVALANCHE-JOURNAL

The Regional Higher Education Roundtable joined educators, parents, local leaders and policy makers together Wednesday in a forum to discuss the progress made on Closing the Gaps, the state’s higher education master plan.

Hosted by the Lubbock Chamber of Commerce, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and the Lumina Foundation, the West Texas Regional meeting was the first of eight to take place across the state.

Click here to read more.

From Borderzine

El Paso must enhance prosperity to retain its best college graduates

By Anoushka Valodya June 1, 2012
EL PASO – City and county leaders met with higher education experts at The University of Texas at El Paso recently to figure out how to stem the brain drain they say is robbing the border region of its future leaders.

“We continue to see too many UTEP graduates taking jobs in other cities,” President Diana Natalicio said. “It’s not because they want to go, but because they don’t have opportunities here. So we’re not going to postpone this conversation any longer.”

Click here to read more.

From The Paper Magazine Online

State Sen. Dan Patrick visits Lone Star College-University Park

Submitted by The Editor May 31, 2012

THE WOODLANDS, TX  – State Sen. Dan Patrick visited Lone Star College-University Park May 23 to tour the new iSchool High at University Park and visit with students and administrators.
iSchool High at University Park is a charter high school on site where college-ready high school students are able to take dual credit classes toward an associate degree from LSC-University Park, while simultaneously completing high school course requirements. It is one of 52 campuses across the state that is part of Responsive Education Solutions, a nonprofit organization based in Dallas.

Click here to read more.

From Bloomberg Online

Obama Campaign Customizing Its ‘Higher Education’ Ads

BY GREGORY GIROUX  MAY 30, 2012

President Obama’s campaign is airing five different versions of an education-themed television ad that emphasizes the importance of education in people’s lives including his own.

Click here to read more.

From The Huff Post Online

Remedial College Classes Need Fixing, Say Experts

Heather Hollingsworth 5/28/12
OVERLAND PARK, Kan. — Each year, an estimated 1.7 million U.S. college students are steered to remedial classes to catch them up and prepare them for regular coursework. But a growing body of research shows the courses are eating up time and money, often leading not to degrees but student loan hangovers.

Click here to read  more.

From Education Week

How Much Will the Common Core Cost?

By Catherine Gewertz

States face key spending decisions as they implement the Common Core State Standards, and a new study finds that they could save about $927 million—or spend as much as $8.3 billion—depending on the approaches they choose in three vital areas: curriculum materials, tests, and professional development.

Click here to read more.

 

WEEK ENDING MAY 25, 2012

From the San Antonio Business Journal


Texas pouring in new scholarship funds for math, science majors

by Tamarind Phinisee, Copyeditor/Reporter
May 24, 2012

Alamo Colleges Alamo Colleges  has received a $895,000 grant from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to fund Texas Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (T-STEM) scholarships for the 2012-2013 academic year.

Click here to read more.

From the Austin American-Statesman


$3.1 million Texas State grant to advance research, diversity

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By Ralph K.M. Haurwitz
AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF

Texas State University has won a $3.1 million federal grant for a project intended to advance materials science and to attract more members of minority groups to that and other technology-related fields.

Click here to read more.

From the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal


Tech cleared for research funds

By BY LEESHA FAULKNERlubbockonline.com

AVALANCHE-JOURNAL

Texas Tech has met the necessary criteria to receive $8 million to $10 million in research funding from the National Research University Fund, according to the Texas State Auditor’s Office.

Officials at Tech received the notice late Thursday afternoon.

Click here to read more.

From Education Week


Relationship Between Advocacy Groups, Unions Uneasy

By Stephen Sawchuk

As a new breed of national education advocacy organizations gains clout, they’re entering into often-uneasy relationships with teachers’ unions—and running into a debate about whether they can play a grassroots “ground game” comparable to that of labor.

Click here to read more.

From Education Week

Rules Proposed for District Race to Top Contest

By Alyson Klein on May 22, 2012

School districts that want a slice of the latest, nearly $400 million in Race to the Top competitive grants will have to put a major focus on helping schools tailor instruction to the needs of individual students—and agree to evaluate school board members and superintendents—under draft regulations released by the U.S. Department of Education Tuesday.

Click here to read more.

From The Chronicle of Higher Education


Romney Pledges to Simplify Federal Student Aid and Revive Bank-Based Lending

By Kelly Field

Mitt Romney, the presumed Republican presidential nominee, outlined his higher-education platform on Wednesday, promising to simplify the federal student-aid system, eliminate burdensome regulations, and revive bank-based student lending.

Click here to read more.

From The Chronicle of Higher Education


Study Shows Promise and Challenges of ‘Hybrid’ Courses

May 22, 2012

By Katie Mangan

Students learn just as much in a course that’s taught partly online as they would in a traditional classroom, but such courses won’t reach their potential until they are both easier for faculty members to customize and more fun for students, according to a report released today.

Click here to read more.

From CBSNews Online

Private East Texas college furloughs workforce

May 23, 2012

JACKSONVILLE, Texas — Ongoing financial woes, including three missed payrolls, prompted a small private East Texas junior college to furlough its workforce Wednesday while officials try to reorganize and save the 158-year-old school.

Click here to read more.

From the Lawrence (Kansas) Journal-World


Statehouse Live: Bill halting state funds for remedial courses at KU, other regents schools sent to governor

By Scott Rothschild— Lawrence Journal-World
May 20, 2012

Topeka — A bill aimed at helping college students who fall below minimum admissions standards to succeed and also halting state funding of remedial courses was approved Sunday.

Click here to read more.

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